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  Sunday, 20 January 2019
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Using the "Tools for Varroa Mite Management" document from the Honey Bee Health Coalition as my road map, and assuming that I will begin testing with alcohol wash(es) from the get-go when I initially get started with my first hive and a nuc, I'd[/hide]'d like to ask experienced keepers if the following plan for control methods and sequencing make sense.
In addition to any chemical treatments and timing listed below I also have ordered enough frames with drone cell foundation for my brood boxes to rotate those frames out to my freezer all season long as needed. All of this is assuming that my alcohol wash test results reveal the worst.
Formic Acid Quick Strips for the Dormant Phase/initially...early May
Apivar during Population Increase Phase: mid-June & late July
Back to Formic Acid Quick Strips during Population Peak: late July-to any honey removal or early September
The idea is to not stay stuck with one treatment for all summer, but to have something thoughtfully in use all season long as needed.
There seems to be so very. much to keep in ones head at one time regarding successful bee keeping but without
control of Varroa mites the rest is rendered futile.
Thank you in advance,
Russ Lavigne
3 years ago
·
#2598
I would be relucant to use Apivar in late June and July. Honey supers are not suppose to be on the hives when this treatment is done. You might consider an Oxalic Acid vaporizer treatment in mid- summer. Using MAQS or Formic Pro is a good idea in early spring in order to kill mites that are under the cappings and then follow up with another treatment, Oxalic maybe, a few weeks afterwards, to kill the phoretic mites. Also, if you use the green drone comb frames be sure to monitor and remove prior to the 24 day cycle. If you miss a date you might end up with a "mite bomb".
In late fall use the Formic again and once the Queen stops laying brood treat with another method, it could be Oxalic or Apivar or maybe Hop Guard. Something to kill off the phoretic mites for the winter. There are no easy solutions to the mite situation. Monitor and start a program and stick with it. Good luck.
3 years ago
·
#2599
I had another thought. I wonder how much the use of the green drone frames takes away from the viability of the Queen. I know the Queen does not fertilize these eggs but she still has to lay an egg. Also, the nurse or worker bees have to attend and cap over all these drone cells that will just be frozen and destroyed. Seems like the Queen is working overtime for nothing. I would rather see thousands of workers be propogated then all the euthanized drones. But again, what do I know !!!! Peter
3 years ago
·
#2600
Peter,
Thank you for weighing in on my question! I certainly will keep your input in mind as I continue to develop my strategy for implementing a control plan for Varroa mites with my bees.
All the best,
Russ Lavigne
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